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Research Article

Probiotic Bifidobacterium breve Induces IL-10-Producing Tr1 Cells in the Colon

  • Seong Gyu Jeon equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Seong Gyu Jeon, Hisako Kayama

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Hisako Kayama equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Seong Gyu Jeon, Hisako Kayama

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Yoshiyasu Ueda,

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Takuya Takahashi,

    Affiliation: Yakult Central Institute for Microbiological Research, Kunitachi, Tokyo, Japan

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  • Takashi Asahara,

    Affiliation: Yakult Central Institute for Microbiological Research, Kunitachi, Tokyo, Japan

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  • Hirokazu Tsuji,

    Affiliation: Yakult Central Institute for Microbiological Research, Kunitachi, Tokyo, Japan

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  • Noriko M. Tsuji,

    Affiliation: Age Dimension Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

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  • Hiroshi Kiyono,

    Affiliations: Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan, Division of Mucosal Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

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  • Ji Su Ma,

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Takashi Kusu,

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Ryu Okumura,

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Hiromitsu Hara,

    Affiliation: Division of Molecular and Cellular Immunoscience, Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Nabeshima, Saga, Japan

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  • Hiroki Yoshida,

    Affiliation: Division of Molecular and Cellular Immunoscience, Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Nabeshima, Saga, Japan

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  • Masahiro Yamamoto,

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Koji Nomoto,

    Affiliation: Yakult Central Institute for Microbiological Research, Kunitachi, Tokyo, Japan

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  • Kiyoshi Takeda mail

    ktakeda@ongene.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    Affiliations: Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan

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  • Published: May 31, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1002714

Reader Comments (1)

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Staining Method about Fig2E

Posted by wachwu on 14 Jun 2012 at 12:49 GMT

I would like to know clearly how they did the co-staining about FoxP3 and IL-10 in Fig2E. In their method parts, it was said that "For intracellular staining for FoxP3 and IL-10, cells were staine using the Foxp3 Staining Buffer set".

Based on my experience before about the co-stainig, the GFP signal will be easily bleached by using the Foxp3 staing buffer set from eBioscience. I would like to know how those authors made it work at there hands.

Another, for the IL10 staining, did the author activate the cells with PMA+Ionomycin? My previous was if activate the cells with PMA+Ionymycin with the presence of Monensin, the signal of FoxP3 was hardly dected.

Thanks for your reading and looking forward to hearing back.

No competing interests declared.