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Research Article

Influenza Virus Transmission Is Dependent on Relative Humidity and Temperature

  • Anice C Lowen mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: anice.lowen@mssm.edu (ACL), peter.palese@mssm.edu (PP)

    Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America

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  • Samira Mubareka,

    Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America

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  • John Steel,

    Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America

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  • Peter Palese mail

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: anice.lowen@mssm.edu (ACL), peter.palese@mssm.edu (PP)

    Affiliations: Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America, Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America

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  • Published: October 19, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.0030151

Reader Comments (1)

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Virus Environment: Influenza

Posted by clarklm4 on 02 Dec 2011 at 16:42 GMT

It is interesting that the influenza virus, or any virus for that matter, is able to thrive at lower temperatures. Generally speaking, when one thinks of an ideal environment for infection and growth, humid and warm areas are first to come to mind. This ability to thrive in dry, cold climates could be a key factor to influenza's seasonality.

No competing interests declared.